Jobs for Retired Teachers

Jobs for Retired Teachers

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John E Chambers
August 26, 2021
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For some retired teachers, life after several years in the classroom means taking up new hobbies.

Others prefer to spend countless hours lounging on their favorite couch watching TV in the comfort and safety of their homes. 

Yet, for some other set of retired teachers, the urge to get a new job is strong, and that’s not because they need income. Instead, they simply love what they’ve spent a large chunk of their lives doing so well.

If you fall into this last category of retired teachers, you have a world of job opportunities outside the classroom waiting to be explored.

The good thing about finding the best jobs for retired teachers is that you don’t have to deal with lots of paperwork, and many of these jobs offer greater flexibility and good pay.

Read on to find out seven of the best-paying, low-stress jobs you can find as a retired teacher.

Tutoring

Tutoring

Transitioning from teaching to tutoring is seamless for a retired teacher. That’s because your experience as an educator gives you a solid springboard to launch into tutoring. 

As a tutor, you are basically doing the same thing you did as a teacher, which is preparing students for academic success. However, instead of working with students of the same age in a classroom, you can work in a variety of settings, including at an office, from home, online, or even in school-based programs. 

Tutors focus on designing tailor-made educational plans that will help students to achieve their academic goals in specific subjects. While you can teach multiple subjects, it is up to you to decide which ones to teach and the students you’ll want to work with.

The general education requirement to take on the job of a tutor is a bachelor’s degree, although potential employers may require specific qualifications and certifications.

How much can be made?

If you want to go into full-time tutoring, you can expect to earn an average annual salary of about $46,000. Since you are retired, you can put in weekend hours to make more money if you want.

Pros

With tutoring, you get significantly less paperwork compared to classroom teaching, and the job offers a lot more flexibility. 

You can easily get recommendations if you do a great job and quickly build a customer base using word of mouth. 

Cons

The work hours might not fit your schedule, especially if you are working with online students in different time zones or if you are expected to work during the weekends.

Educational Consultant

Educational Consultant

School boards, parents, as well as students need proper educational planning and guidance to realistically address academic issues. That’s where the services of an educational consultant come into play. 

The job of an educational consultant revolves around advising government officials, school administrations, school boards, teachers, and families on the most appropriate technologies and techniques used in the classroom. 

As a retired teacher, you must have seen a few loopholes in the educational system during your active working years. If you are passionate about promoting educational best practices, you are probably a good fit for this career path.

While you may pursue a career as an educational consultant without a master’s degree, those with the qualification in a relevant field have a better chance to earn more and quickly move through the ranks.

If you are really passionate about this career path, you could proceed to graduate school after retirement and even get relevant certifications to increase your chances of getting noticed by potential clients. 

How much can be made?

How much you can earn as an educational consultant will depend on whether you work as an employee for an education consulting institution or an independent consultant. On average, though, these professionals can make anywhere between $46,494 and $65,562 per year. 

Pros

This is a fulfilling career for those who want to see improvement in the educational system.

An educational consultant has plenty of opportunities for rapid advancement and can quickly attain the status of an expert or specialist. This makes it one of the best jobs for retired teachers who are still active and passionate about the system.

Cons

Vast experience and extensive schooling are required. You may need to work long hours in many cases. 

Career Coach

Career Coach

Teaching has a lot in common with coaching – you basically spend an average of 47 hours a week for several years grooming young people to become better in life. This is why a career coach is a suitable job a retired teacher can do.

Similar to what you do in the classroom, the duties of a career coach revolve around helping individuals to choose the right career path.

To do this, you will unearth the strengths, weaknesses, goals, and objects of individual clients to find out the best ways to apply their skill set. Apart from working with individuals, you can expand your reach by working with organizations to train staff. 

Generally, your vast teaching experience plus your teaching certification makes you an excellent candidate for this position. But a bachelor’s degree in counseling gives you an upper hand as a retired teacher. 

How much can be made?

The average salary of a career coach is about $56,222 per year or $4,685 monthly, making it rank among the highest-paying jobs for retired teachers.

Pros

The job of a career coach is exciting, and you get to work with clients from different organizations. It can also open you up to travel opportunities for lectures and seminars, especially if you work in the corporate arena. 

Cons

It can take several years to establish a name for yourself as a career coach.

Creating Lessons Plans (and selling them!)

Creating Lessons Plans

Remember how tiresome and dreary it was to create, edit, and update lessons plans?

Of course, you do! This is an aspect of classroom teaching that many teachers don’t particularly enjoy. 

If you had the chance back when you were active in the classroom, you would have outsourced this rather monotonous task, right?

Well, guess what? Teachers who are still in the classroom wish someone will fill this pressing need, too! That’s not because they are not hardworking but it will allow them to focus more on their students and simply adapt the lesson plans to suit current needs. 

Teachers will benefit from your wealth of teaching experience and expertise if you create lesson plans for them. Plus, you will be giving back meaningful knowledge and impacting the new crop of teachers. 

How much can be made?

There is no fixed amount you can make selling your lesson plans. It all comes down to the websites where you sell them, how much you charge per download, and how many teachers download your lesson plans. 

To increase your chances of being profitable, it is best to be a contributor to some of the best teacher marketplaces where all the potential buyers are teachers. Some examples include Teacher Pay Teachers, EdGalaxy, and TeacherSherpa.

Pros

You can create lesson plans once and sell them over and over again, earning residual income and royalties.

It is possible to sell one lesson plan on more than one website to increase your earning potential.

The job is pretty flexible, allowing you to put in as much time and effort as you would like. Plus you can work from home.

Cons

The competition is high with several thousand contributors on different websites

Self-employment taxes can be stiff

Adjunct Professor

Adjunct Professor

An adjunct professor is another career that’s easy to transition into as a retired teacher. It simply means a part-time university or college professor, making it an ideal job for retired teachers who are still passionate about teaching in a classroom.

This is one job that doesn’t get you involved in college politics. Instead, you are simply focused on developing engaging lesson plans, reviewing and improving syllabi, and understanding the needs of students.

In many cases, you need to have a minimum of a master’s degree to fill the position of an adjunct professor. However, a bachelor’s degree with relevant work experience may be enough for some technical schools and community colleges. 

How much can be made?

Adjunct professors are paid per course on a part-time basis. Their national average salary is approximately $68 per hour. This puts the average monthly salary somewhere around $1,000 or a little more.

Pros

Very flexible duties, as you are not bogged down with conducting research, publishing, or other responsibilities like full-time professors.

You can take more than one adjunct professor position in as many colleges as you are comfortable working with. 

Cons

The pay is considerably small compared to the salary of full-time college professors, so you will have to work several jobs if you want to make a decent salary from this career alone.

Test Scorer

Test Scorer

Teaching involves a lot of paperwork! The task of checking and grading student’s assignments is not particularly fun for many teachers. Fortunately, some people enjoy reading and evaluating student’s essays, homework, and tests. 

If this is you, you’re then the job of a test scorer might interest you. There are quite a growing number of schools and testing services looking to outsource the tedious task of scoring to retired teachers. The job typically involves scoring exams, assessment tests, and other tests. 

Scorers can suggest improvements after rating the test taker’s responses. In some cases, they may be required to provide written feedback for the test taker.

A test scorer is required to have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree and several years of teaching experience. 

How much can be made?

In the United States, the average base pay for a test scorer is $35,930 per annum. However, the hourly pay can vary depending on your location and the institution’s pay scale.

Pros

You can make your own schedule, work from home, or an office, depending on what you prefer.

Cons

It is usually a seasonal job since most standardized tests are done at certain times of the year.

Public Speaker

Public Speaker

Many people get butterflies in their stomachs when they think about speaking in public. But teachers are not among this set of people. That’s because they’ve spent all their lives speaking in front of people of all ages in the classroom. 

With your years of teaching and conducting research, you can lean in on your strength and find topics you are passionate about, and then create captivating lectures around those topics.

Alternatively, you could become a public speaker for different companies and help them deliver captivating presentations, seminars, or even sales pitches. 

While your several years of teaching experience is usually enough to get you to speak professionally on topics relating to education, a bachelor’s degree in your area of expertise makes you more visible to potential employers.

How much can be made?

Public speakers who deliver lectures and seminars have a median salary of approximately $51,000 per year.

Pros

There are plenty of travel opportunities for public speakers than most other jobs for retired teachers. 

Cons

You need to be highly specialized in a specific field. Also, job bookings as a public speaker can fluctuate. 

Conclusion

The transition to a new career can be daunting, especially when you have spent decades of your adult life in the classroom. But you can make the switch less shocking if you choose from any of the jobs for retired teachers mentioned above. 

The important thing to do is to first access your professional skills to know which role will suit you best. You may need to get additional certifications or training for certain jobs, but in most cases, your vast experience and expertise in the classroom already qualify you to take on these jobs.

Reference:

John E Chambers

John E Chambers is an experienced financial advice expert. Born in Chicago, he has a master's in Industrial Finance, but he has spent decades offering investment advice to businesses and individuals alike. He is the founder of RetireeWorkforce.com and wants the website to be valuable for retirement advice. In addition, he writes articles that help users jump-start their retirement plans and choose the best investment options. If not pondering over stock market statistics or reading some magazines, you can find John spending time with his family. As an early retiree, John also offers unique insights into what post-retirement life is like.